JUDY GARLAND: A JAZZ MEDLEY WITH COUNT BASIE FROM 'THE JUDY GARLAND SHOW'.

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JUDY GARLAND: A JAZZ MEDLEY WITH COUNT BASIE FROM 'THE JUDY GARLAND SHOW'. 5
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The Great Count Basie appeared with Judy on Episode 2 of her show. The program aired on November 10,1963.This medley - 'I Hear Music', 'The Sweetest Sounds', & 'Strike Up The Band' - is, for me, a powerful mix of genius. Judy is glowing, doing what she does Best, with The Best. The respect & admiration of these Great Artists for each other is quite evident. Judy is in her element with her first love in music ... Jazz.
William "Count" Basie (August 21, 1904 April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. Widely regarded as one of the most important jazz bandleaders of his time, Basie led his popular Count Basie Orchestra for almost 50 years.

'I Hear Music' is a popular song composed by Burton Lane, with lyrics by Frank Loesser for the Paramount Pictures movie "Dancing on a Dime".(1940)

I hear music
Mighty fine music (Judy sings only this verse.)
The murmur of a morning breeze up there
The rattle of the milkman on the stair
Sure that's music
Mighty fine music
The singing of a sparrow in the sky
The perking of the coffee right near by
That's my favorite melody
You my angel, phoning me
I hear music
Mighty fine music
And anytime I think my world is wrong
I get me out of bed and sing this song

'The Sweetest Sounds,'a 1962 song by Richard Rodgers.
From the 1962 Broadway musical "No Strings".

The sweetest sounds I'll ever hear
Are still inside my head
The kindest words I'll ever know
Are waiting to be said
The most entrancing sight of all
Is yet for me to see
And the dearest love (Judy sings:The greatest band) in all the world
Is waiting somewhere for me
Is waiting somewhere, waiting somewhere,
Waiting, waiting for me.

'Strike Up the Band', a 1927 song by George and Ira Gershwin written for a Broadway musical by the same name.
Also, a 1940 MGM musical directed by Busby Berkeley and starring Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney.
Judy sings a customized arrangement of this song.

Let the drums roll out
Let the trumpet call
While the people shout
Strike up the band
Hear the cymbals ring
Callin' one and all
To the martial swing,
Strike up the band
There is work to be done, to be done
There's a war to be won, to be won
Come, you son of a son of a gun,
Take your stand
Fall in line, yea a bow
Come along, let's go
Hey, leader, strike up the band!
There is work to be done, to be done
There's a war to be won, to be won
Come, you son of a son of a gun,
Take your stand
Fall in line, yea a bow
Come on, let's go
Hey, leader, strike up
Hey, leader, strike up
Hey, leader, strike up the band

*No copyright infringement intended*

💬 Comments on the video
Author

OMG...never saw this!! Camera work here is fabulous-- love how they show all band members. And who knew (I didn't) that Judy did jazz, and with the Count, yet!! Her voice is powerful- love the revelation of Count Basie @ 1:38- just marvelous!! Thank you so much.

Author — mca1218

Author

@Roy Smith: Also type in her name with "Opera vs. Jazz" or also "Every Sunday, " and give a listen.

Author — cellarcoat

Author

She was brought up singing popular music, which, in the 20's, 30's, 40's 50's was Jazz based. Garland had a vrey large voice and sounds more like Joe Turner or Sinatra, only louder, but she evidently has no trouble, in fact appears to relish putting this medley across with ease. She also seems to be the first person to perform Rap, Have a listen/look at 'A Great Lady Gives an Interview' fr Zigfield Follies, as she parodies many famous Glamour pusses of her day.She's wildly funny and stunning.

Author — MuzzyVanH

Author

@Roy Smith: It's clear you know very little about Judy Garland. She sang jazz, swing, blues, rock (before Elvis), pop (before Michael Jackson), and punk rock before the style was given a name. I suggest you type in her name with "Dixieland Band" and give it a listen.

Author — cellarcoat

Author

Judy Garland sing jazz... you have got to be joking but the Count and his band were great.

Author — Roy Smith

Author

Garland wasn't primarily a jazz singer, but if you open your ears and use your brain, you just may realize she's singing in the style of jazz which is rare for her, backed by great jazz musicians.... She also happened to have had so much soul that she was idolized by many great jazz singers, who happened to sing pop songs in the style of jazz (like Sarah, Ella, Tormé, etc.). So I'd say 2+2=4, and anyone who appreciates good music should know the score here, bub.

Jeez, snotty attitudes abound.

Author — matt

Author

This is a great band and a great singer. The opinion that says Judy
can't sing jazz is to cheapen and reduce "jazz" to those superficial
"isms" that we use to justify when it "sounds like jazz" and when it
"does not sound like jazz".

Author — John-Giovanni Corda

Author

Yes, Judy was a great singer who transcended genres. Her admirers include the likes of Maria Callas, Aretha Franklin and Ella Fitzgerald. Enough said ...

Author — bvheath

Author

It’s a Pity that she was a Child in a Racist Quagmire.
MGM choose her Roles and Her Songs, But Listen to her Vocal Response to “ This Joint is Jumpin’ !”
Swing and Jazz were what she Preferred, but you really have to search through those old Andy Hardy Pictures to find them!
MGM released a Double Album of Her Recordings, but they’re not all there, either. 🌹Je t’adore, Judy !

Author — Subversively Surreal

Author

Judy brings to the song that _which was not already there._ She certainly DOES "jazz" it up by anyone's standard. There are those who, upon hearing a "# 11" or a "flat 9" or "blues scale" notes added in, will jump in and proclaim "Now THAT'S JAZZ". NO. Those are mere "isms" that you can train anyone to sing or play.

Author — John-Giovanni Corda

Author

Count Basie could bring the best out of singers. He was a tremendous musician and human being. Judy was @ her best with him. She got into the Count from her association with Sarah Vaughan whom she adored.

Author — 2dasimmons