Yew - The Sacred Tree

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  • ℹ️ Published 11 years ago
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💬 Comments
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Wow, I hadn't realized yew trees can live for thousands of years. Amazing trees!

Author — Supermassive Black Hole A*

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@nottinghamscience This is great stuff- I just watched your whole series and love the history especially. Please keep them coming!

Author — pulpculchure

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Lovin' this dissemination of tree knowledge.

Author — 0dinseye

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A Yew stood up the road from our house and was part of the scenery . I’d left the village for 7 years but on returning was aware of a strange emptiness until I realised it had completely vanished from the front garden boundary’s of no. 9/ 11 . Within a couple of years the perpetrator of it’s removal had expired also -in spite of being less ancient at around 48 years old. The superstition re these old creatures shouldn’t be underestimated ! Regards from Wessex

Author — New Forest Pixies

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To curious minds, your videos are always fresh fountainhead of interests. Thank you!

Author — yusukeshinyama

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I love these videos, always learning something!

Author — dondude69

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So nice video.
As you say in Spain we alwo have some places with natural (non planted) yew trees, like Montserrat and some others in northern mountains. I love it and in the shield of Gipuzkoa, a bask province, there are represented 3 yew trees.

Author — Nueva Base Polar Agarthi

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@CommonRaven I was born in a mountainous area in Japan, and sure they're biologically interesting, but they also have a lot of cultural traditions and fascinating stories about trees, perhaps just as many as Britain's. I'd like to see those explained by local people (I, for one, know very little too). I wish every country had a channel like this.

Author — yusukeshinyama

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The Sagittarius Archer's bow was made from the yew tree.

Author — yvette willis

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Those trees are so beautiful! I don’t think we have them in Canada!

Author — Crazy Canadian 🍁

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I made a pilgrimage to see the Fortingall Yew in Perthshire, in 2015. I love to eat yew fruit, and have even made a jam from it. Food in winter is much appreciated, even if the seed, as with the rest of the tree, is toxic. Note : Taxus, yew; toxos, bow, & toxic, poisonous.

Author — Christopher Ellis

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yew is one of the most beautiful grained and coloured timbers i love working with it, turning it ect its also extraordinary hard, my family have been working in the sawmill/waterwheel/water turbine industry foe maybe 100 years., me im hoping to finish medicine but i will always have a love for all the types of timber, the guy below me rates larch very highly and so he should its a fabulously strong and long lasting timber much like douglas!!

Author — atourdeforce

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My friend finds fallen yew pieces and crafts amazing weapong tools and art with them, lamps masks, , , it's the Western yew wich is fairly common here, he only takes the fallen pieces, wich works well because it doesn't rot!

Author — Ur Monn

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yew bows were legendary and considered absolutely precious according to the sagas of the viking age in Iceland, it may well be that the yew in the Uk is to gnarly and twisted for bowmaking, but yew was used nonetheless. i have a yew bow myself, it has a few knots but it doesnt matter. its quite strong. yew was also considered holy in norse mythology, which must be an ancient tradidion because there is no yew in Iceland, and it was settled in 870. i dont think there is yew in norway either.

Author — Vonargandur

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Only problem is those Druids didnt call them Yew trees they called them Eber trees where we get the word "berry" from also the root of the word Hebrew (H was added by the Scots like the name Andrew).

Author — richardm

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YewTube - for the sacred tree hugger in us all.

Author — singlespies

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will you be covering the maple tree? for all the canadians who watch your video, which are all great.

Author — ssnp

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Defiantly not from saplings.
A bow stave has both sapwood and heartwood (see the picture from 0:53 to 1:00 the different colour s of the inside and outside of the bows) and exploits the different properties of the two woods. A tree has to be reasonable mature to be able to cut such a stave.

Author — x42brown

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I use a sauce from the tip of the yew tree and it's very effective for some skin problems- the Naitive Americans used it

Author — Ali Simon

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So cool, this must be where the keebller elves live!

Author — Scrap5000