Hitler's Blood Flag - The Mystery of the Blutfahne

  • 🎬 Video
  • ℹ️ Published 3 years ago
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What happened to the infamous 'Blood Flag', a Nazi relic kept in the Braun House in Munich. Was it destroyed by Allied bombing, looted by locals, taken as a souvenir by US troops? Discover the full story here.

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Disclaimer: All opinions and comments expressed in the 'Comments' section do not reflect the opinions of Mark Felton Productions. All opinions and comments should contribute to the dialogue. Mark Felton Productions does not condone written attacks, insults, racism, sexism, extremism, violence or otherwise questionable comments or material in the 'Comments' section, and reserves the right to delete any comment violating this rule or to block any poster from the channel.

This video is not monetised and all images and film are used in accordance with Fair Use for educational purposes.

💬 Comments
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Grandma: I thought you might want this flag, dear, because you're a history buff. It was in the attic with some of Papa's things. I washed it for you.

Author — Mark T.

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These need to be made in to a TV series, far better produced than what I'm paying licence money for

Author — Jesse Harris

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My great grandfathers were in ww2 infantry. one in pacific and one in europe. On my moms side the one in Europe he brought home some stuff he got out of germany including a nazi flag we still have it today, its crazy when you hold it to know it was made by the actually nazis themselves and whoever made it never would of imagined it would of ened up in TN in the united states in the basement of the great grandson of an American soldier who would be commenting about it in 2019 on youtube.

Author — JoeyBLiberty B

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Many years ago when I was stationed in West Germany I met a former German Army officer who told me that the Blood flag was taken to the South American nation of Chile by a member of the SS who placed it in a bank safe deposit box for safe keeping.

Author — Thomas Bleming

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It's probably in some veteran's basement, unknown by them as to its significance.

Author — dakota

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It's in a crate in a US warehouse next to the crate with the Ark of the Covenant

Author — flimsyjimnz

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You ever get so drunk that you try to overthrow the government?

Author — Adam Oneal

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Mark Felton does anyone know the exact dimensions and conditions of the Blutfahne? My Grandpa had one in his desk for 50 years when he passed away I got it, it did have what looked like blood stains on it. I have compared it to photos and it's size does not seem to quite match. Either way it's locked up in a bank, great video!

Author — Jay Albertz

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I believe the flag was taken home by an American GI thinking it was just another ordinary Nazi Banner not knowing what he had

Author — Clancy Woodard

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I know its been said in many ways, but your channel is like no other.
This feels like the History channel I remember from when I was little.
Those days sitting and watching with my grandma and uncle played a big part in my love of history today

Author — Kyle H

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Flag consecration ("Fahnenweihe") goes back to the 10th century and is apparently really just a German and Austrian thing and done only in the Catholic church. It's exactly what the name implies. A Catholic priest consecrates a flag. The roots of its contemporary practice (yes, it's still being done in parts of Austria and Germany, both military and civilian) are within the Prussian and Austrian military.

Author — Edohiguma

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"Tonight on Antiques Roadshow..."

Author — David

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I mean, they could also have destroyed it, considering how much they loved the old tradition. Letting your crown standard fall into enemy hands is the greatest shame, which is why here in Denmark the only respectful way to destroy the flag is to burn it, it stems from back in the old days where you did actually have banner carriers on the battlefield.

Author — six2make4

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it's still unlikely it survived even if it somehow made it to America with a plucky G.I., as anyone born between 44' and the late 90's would have thoroughly played soldier with it, believing it to be just another relic from the war. my father supposedly had a Japanese battle flag, helmets and a sword- the sword being the only survivor of his childhood, and barely survived mine to be discovered as an extremely rare Japanese navy Kai-Gunto, or short Navy katana. I'm only 24. my father always thought it was made by some poor smithy after the war for occupying troops, to make some money to live on. he was quite surprised when I did extensive research on it, to discover it's true origin.

Author — Tank Acebo

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Yet another superb video, showcasing a piece of WW2 history that I imagine most people were previously unaware of. This channel is excellent!

Author — David Brown Ifer Wong

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Even as a staunch anti nazi, , i recognise the value of artifacts from ww2, when i worked in a carehome some relatives knowing my interest in ww2 gave me a silver nazi wound badge that they had bought from antiques shop. one of the Ladies who worked in the carehome told me her great aunt and uncle had seen rudolf hesses plane flying roughly above saltcoats town and stevenston town he flew north of isle of arran, realised he was leaving britain, u turned and crashed at eaglesham!

Author — Bryan Head

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The looting solder's mother no-doubt found the flag, along with her son's comic book and baseball card collection (which would be worth over $1 million today), and she threw them away, like millions of other mothers back in the day. That's what happened to MY father's comic books, probably in the early 50s. BTW, he took part in the Korean conflict.

Author — yohannbiimu

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It could have been burnt after the war during de-nazification by pretty much anyone who had a stong disdain for Nazi germany and got their hands on it.

Author — Geiger Tec

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With so many WWII vets dying in the U.S., and many of the widows, and other heirs not understanding the significance of such "war booty", it may get sold to a collector, or more likely destroyed, or thrown in the trash.

Author — Anatoli B. Suvarov

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The March on Rome was not 11 years before 1923. It was 1 year :)

Author — K98_Zock_TV