Mike Rowe on What 300 Dirty Jobs Taught Him About True Success with Lewis Howes

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Mike Rowe on What 300 Dirty Jobs Taught Him About True Success with Lewis Howes 5
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This is audio podcast number #403 with MIke Rowe

Mike Rowe is a TV host, writer, narrator, producer, actor and spokesman. His performing career began in 1984, when he faked his way into the Baltimore Opera to get his union card and meet girls, both of which he accomplished during a performance of Rigoletto. His transition to television occurred in 1990 when — to settle a bet — he auditioned for the QVC Shopping Channel and was promptly hired after talking about a pencil for nearly eight minutes. There, he worked the graveyard shift for three years, until he was ultimately fired for making fun of products and belittling viewers.

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💬 Comments on the video
Author

What's the #1 thing you pulled from the interview?

Author — Lewis Howes

Author

I saw this guy playing Tim Allen's brother and Last Man Standing.

Author — Travis Kraft

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"Don't follow your passion, take it with you wherever you go" - Mike Rowe

Author — Bhodisatvas

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My first job was garbage man - riding on the back of a truck, slinging cans. 10 years later, I became a member of The White House Press Corps as a photojournalist. I don't miss covering the president. I do miss the Mexican-American fellows with whom I worked shoulder to shoulder every day. And if they'd let me, I'd do it again now.

Author — James Vincent Knowles

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I've always thought Mike Rowe was one of the most fascinating men I've ever observed. Super intelligent and articulate and definitely multi dimensional. I love this guy. Definitely authentic. I could listen to him all day everyday.👏👏👏👍🏻

Author — Lara O'neal

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I saw this guy playing Tim Allen's brother and Last Man Standing.

Author — Travis Kraft

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Correction Mr. Rowe: YOU are the epitome of masculinity. Your voice alone embodies everything it means to be a man.

Love your interviews Lewis! Thanks for doing what you do.

Author — Deebz76

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Loved the interview. Something about the perspective of Jim that really appeals to me. 16 spent almost a year working on my grandfathers farm in Jamaica from 5am-7pm everyday. Hardwork builds character and is no substitute to drawing out the best of who you are.

Author — Jermaine Edwards

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Mike talking about hearing his father's voice yell "Duck" and his response to that voice without knowing why he'd said it is a perfect analogy of our need for knowing God and for having an intimate relationship with Him in which we know His voice and respond to Him at all times.

Author — Pam Gessler

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"They looked to see where everyone was going...and went the other way." 🙌🙌🙌

Author — A Beautiful Horizon

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I think this is the longest interview I'd watched in my life, but I enjoyed every minute of it. What an inspiration of passion and commitment to be true to oneself in whatever we do. I can see the honesty and sincerity in you guys and that is so valuable. Loved the part about working hard! It seems like that is a thing of the past in many places. Thank you, Lewis!!

Author — Daniel Pineda

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Probably the longest YouTube video I've seen that wasn't a movie.

Enjoyed every minute of it.
Thank you, Lewis.

Author — Yair C. Libman

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when a mentor of mine told me work smarter not harder he was referring to using levers wedges and pulleys to make the job go easier and faster. I appreciate Mike speaking up for work ethic. Hopefully America will listen.

Author — Brett Parsons

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Great show. I love his commentary on men and masculinity, aha moments, impacting change. I love sensitive manly men!

Author — Brenda Lynch

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The thing about hard work though, is that once you get into exploring it, there's a whole universe to it. Sure, if your particular problem right now is that you don't know where and what hard work can bring you - the answer definitely is: find a way to dive into it. But once you're in those waters (of hard work so to speak), you're going to have to figure out how to stay afloat, how to swim, how to deal with the particular circumstances of who you are and what your hard-work environment consists of. And in my experience, when a lot of people ask for help and guidance at this point, more often than not they're told to figure it out on their own. Or to read a book. And they struggle to find someone to guide and support them in the process who they can afford. My 2 cents.

Author — Judith Montel

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The Chaos Theory, or commonly known as the Butterfly Effect, is somewhat central to Mr. Rowes' interview. Very small, almost insignificant events in one's life can have huge ramifications way on down the line, sometimes many years. There's a small cadre of what we call "Important" people in this world. Smaller still are a few that if they were to disappear, or Not disappear at a very sensitive period, could literally change the entire planet. There's a large amount of people that thinks that they are insignificant, and what happens to them won't really change things in the long run, but that's not true, at least not at that particular moment because none of us can determine what's going to happen in the future. Suppose as a last act before death a young average man struggles to makes love to his wife one last time, a child is born from that, and 500 years from now a person from that lineage develops a weapon that ultimately destroys the planet, or solves the faster than light problem rushing humanity out to the stars. Never take yourself lightly and don't underestimate the life experiences you pick up along the way and don't be afraid to do things that you may have thought beneath you, you never know where it may lead.

Author — Titus Tucker

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Such a gratifying interview. Perspective was re-calibrated for me honestly.

Author — Flips '66 Caprice

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The part of the conversation where he says the jobs we need the most are the most underrated hits home especially during covid. People that make 3 times what a tradesman does gets to stay home to stay safe, while we are still out here cleaning shit

Author — Mason Martin

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I wish this guy were my Uncle Mike. I'd talk to him constantly.

Author — Michipreneur 1

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I wish dirty jobs was still on. The re-runs never get old though. Love you Mike Rowe

Author — Jesus Cadena