History - Vanished in the Mists 1 - Lost Newfoundland

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History - Vanished in the Mists 1 - Lost Newfoundland 5
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Lost History of Newfoundland

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Multiple distinct groups historically populated Newfoundland, DNA study suggests
'This in turn implies that the island of Newfoundland was populated multiple times by distinct groups'

Author — PSheaves Gazefar

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Amazing! So interesting with beautiful visuals & music. I hope to visit there some day!

Author — Pamela Mkhaimer

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amazing just totally and very informative.love this vid!! 100--100 ty for posting and this, I ll call documentary, is so lovely.

Author — battlehrfred

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Our plan this year and next year is to bring some history back out

Author — Stafford Films

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background music too loud !!! I am old!

Author — Stacy Wolbeck

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Love the video but find it hard to understand the facts shared by the french fella because of the volume of the music. Had to stop and listen a couple of times to get it all.

Author — Debra P

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I highly doubt Mossy Edward lived for 200 yrs

Author — Chris Smith

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The fact that you are using the specific word for the Beothuk people is great, however, referring to them as Indian is not. Wish you could change that?

Author — whitewatersiren33

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Great, but the music takes away by its intrusion.

Author — Virginia R Parker

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incredible video. Haiti revolutionan and battle for newfoundlAND are seldomly taught tales

Author — Mart Gregory

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I have removed abusive and profane comments as is my right.

Author — PSheaves Gazefar

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We trace ourselves from Grate Cove and have deeds from 1660's....

Author — Margot Fanny

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I'd love to know where the filmmakers got the detail that "23 of Guy's colonists" died in the winter of 1612-1613 at Cupids. Every account I've seen is based on Henry Crout's journal which only lists 8 deaths that winter.

Author — Trudy Morgan-Cole

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Any history about Newfoundland and Labrador, home to two First Nation groups, the Mi'kmaq on Newfoundland island, and the Innu, living in central and northern Labrador, can hardly be complete.

Author — Roger Scott Cathey

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my home and native land, Wouldn't leave it for the world.

Author — Loretta Russell

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Very interesting. James Winters is correct, however I don't feel guilty about some of the violent past because I had nothing to do with it. It's unfortunate but that's the way it was in just about every part of the world at some time.

Author — john browne

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Portuguese were first over according to natgeo

Author — john cotgrave

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No such thing as "Be'of\tut", and "McMac" and Chief SillyBoi...
DNA Lanse D'amour burial 7500.BC...


White blond green eyes aboriginal and BS, propaganda... .
Basque, Nordic, Irish shots... Solutrean Cromagnum

Author — Stevo Lution

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There was very little contact between Europeans and Beothuk. The only group that actively hunted them were Micmac who had been brought to NL by the French. They took heads, but also women, so the Beothuk blood is not entirely dead.

Author — rex mundi

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Based on archaeological evidence, a group known as the Maritime Archaic people appeared in Labrador about 8, 000 years ago, as ice age glaciers were retreating. At some point, they crossed over to the island of Newfoundland where they left a long record of habitation that lasted until about 3, 200 years ago. At that point, signs of their presence fade from the archeological record. Researchers speculate that a cooling climate made Newfoundland less hospitable to people who were, by then, adapted to living off marine mammals and other coastal resources.

Over the next 2, 000 years or so, the island was frequented by Paleo-Eskimo groups spreading southward from the Arctic. They may have been the "skraelings" described by Norse explorers who tried to settle on the northwestern tip of Newfoundland around 1, 000 A.D.

The Beothuk appeared next and they were still there when Europeans began settling in Newfoundland starting in 1630. During the centuries that followed, the Beothuk generally avoided contact with Europeans and lost access to the coastal part of their landscape, a crucial change that is chemically recorded in their remains because it forced them switch to a poorer land-based diet. Clashes with colonists and exposure to Old World diseases effectively brought about their extermination within 200 years.

Author — PSheaves Gazefar