Why NOT to Visit Yellowstone National Park -- DON'T GO !!!!!!

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Why NOT to Visit Yellowstone National Park -- DON'T GO !!!!!! 3.5







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Just CLICKING these links helps us make more videos. THANK YOU!


RV camping gear:


Airstream essentials:

AFFILIATE LINK DISCLOSURE: Friends, making a quality Loloho video is kind of like making sausage – only slightly more violent. It's a ridiculous amount of work that typically involves high dollar camera drops, blue-screen-of-death computer crashes, and at least one angry shotgun wielding old man shouting, “Hey! Get the hell outta here!” Once the final video is posted, rewards here on YouTube are few and far between (unless you are a masochist who enjoys being verbally abused by anonymous trolls). One saving grace is our affiliate links. JUST CLICKING THESE LINKS HELPS TO SUPPORT OUR LITTLE SHOW. Think of this clicking as like tipping - except that it doesn't cost you anything extra! If you eventually make a purchase via one of our affiliate links, we will receive a few pennies (and Sean typically invests these pennies in duct tape and video gear). Again, it doesn't cost you anything to click these links, and it's a great help to us. As always, safe travels, happy camping, and THANK YOU!


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Author — Long Long Honeymoon

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Sounds to me, , "someone" wants the place ALL TO HIMSELF!

HAHA, , understood!

Author — Ro'ber Harpane'

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Animals are not crossing the road, it's the road that is crossing their ancient pathways.

Author — Raj s

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incredible the level of total stupidity by most commenters who must simply be unable to understand intentional sarcasm!

Author — Giancarlo Moscetti

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I would say DO go to Yellowstone. Just follow all rules with wildlife and geysers. It was my stomping ground for many years. Gorgeous!

Author — Linda Moses

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They haven't replaced and updated the waterfalls and hot springs in many years! same old bison just like in the 40's...

Author — Robert O'Connor

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Basically, don't go to Yellowstone if you are a bloody pansy.

Author — Vladshock

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Nice try on trying to keep me away from the few remaining human-free places, but I'm going anyway. I hate humans and need a break sometimes. Yellowstone is awesome.

Author — Creatures of the Wild

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i just got back from yellowstone and tetons, it was so beautiful

Author — RāMBō

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Let's see, I went there in 1962, '80, '89, '92, '95, '98. In 1962 there were vast crowds and black bears everywhere, who were being fed by tourists, who occasionally learned why you shouldn't. In 1980 I was out strolling in the campground in the evening and I almost got run over by a moose, and marmots replaced the bears. 1989 was right after the big fires, so the next few times I was there I could watch the changes. A bison turned up in my campsite and I got really good pictures of it, keeping the picnic table between it and me. 1998 was especially nice, since it was October and there were no crowds. Oh, and an elk tried to eat my tent. I think it's time to go back. I miss Norris Geyser Basin.

Author — Colin MacKenzie

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Funny how some of these people don't see your sarcasm.

Author — steve long

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I have been to the Park so many times that I know every inch of it as I lived not far from the south gate and would frequent every weekend . Just me my dog and my bible and fishing rod . I can't tell you a better time than that . Last time I was there was 2009 and I love the Park, it is a beautiful place ....

Author — MrCowboy Merrill

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I went to yellowstone and its literally my favorite spot on earth (even over anywhere in California, every Hawaiian island, or Florida). When i went on my trip i saw a pair of moose, which were MASSIVE. We were able to get within a couple hundred meters of them. I also saw a black bear and cub walking down a hill a few hundred meters away, and a brown bear ontop a mountain walking about a mile or more away from where i was (was just barely able to follow him with my binoculars), an eagle, a beaver den while river rafting, massive herds of bison, and about every time of deer species they have. To bad i didnt see any wolves :( . though seeing the pair of moose totally makes up for it. A local photographer who lived there for 8 years told me in all his time staying in Yellowstone he never say a full grown male and female pair. Its just gorgeous (the grand canyon of yellowstone and all the waterfalls around were beautiful). I went in late may and i had perfect weather, about 72ish everyday. After spending a few days in Gardiner, Montana and exploring the park we went down to stay at the old faithful snow lodge and had an amazing time there also. The locals were super friendly and i met so many great people.

I will never forget the experience i had in yellowstone and i plan to take my future family there one day. Its a magical place. Also the Corral Drive-in in Gardiner has the most amazing Bison burger, it blew me away! A little funny story, there was a herd of bison/buffalo on the road and along the road, and some asian women decided to get out of her car and try to walk up and pet them. Lets just say it didnt go well and after the bison almost killed her, the park rangers/by standers had to yell at her and get her to run away.

Author — Zack Allen

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Yellowstone is the best place I've ever been too there's much wildlife

Author — Krazy- Guitar

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I seen the most beautiful landscape in the USA there... There is no other place like it... It's like stepping back in time 500 years ago. The Buffalo in late winter is amazing, when their coats start to shred... The sure size of these magnificent creatures is astounding. Yellowstone is my favorite place on Earth.

Author — Susan Hernandez

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I highly recommend going it's one of the most amazing places you'll visit I've been!

Author — jack boyd

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I also worked in Fishing Bridge during college. In 1961 I pumped gas at the Conoco station, and we ate hearty meals at the Hamilton store next door. Bears were everywhere back then, and the bridge was covered with hundreds of people, many fishing. And cars crossing the bridge during the day with their windows down sometimes got a fish hook through the window, with some nasty results. The water in Lake Yellowstone WAS ice cold, and you had to go out into it very slowly. But on a 95 degree day, I and a pal spent an hour in the lake up to our necks and we walked WAY out into the lake to where the cabin cruisers were fishing. Can't believe I was so dumb because I can't swim, but my buddy was a lifeguard in LA, so I wasn't too worried. We made it back to the dirty beach, and I promptly fell asleep on my stomach. Four hours later I awoke with severe burns on my neck and back and arms and legs ... the nurse tried everything, but only Noxema helped, yet I hallucinated all night and itched all over. Next day she gave me an antihistamine that stopped the nightmare, but my skin had a thousand tiny bubbles on it. Four hours in the sun with no protection at 8, 000' is nasty business ... don't do it. Bison back then were far fewer than today, though I heard that a crowd of people at Old Faithful surrounded a bison near the geyser, and it finally panicked and burst through the crowd, trampling a person to death. Other deaths that summer were in the Yellowstone River when a fellow accidentally rolled his Buick into that FAST flowing water. The car flipped and hung up, but it took hours for the Rangers to pull it in with his dead body inside. Another man died after crashing his VW into a moose jam (cars all stopped to look at mooses). And an eight year old boy sleeping in a tent at Fishing Bridge was attacked by a sick black bear that took a huge bite out of his stomach. He was flown to Jackson hospital but didn't survive. YP was FILLED with campgrounds and tiny, cheap ($4) cabins back then. And so many bears that you just couldn't believe it. I have enough bear stories to fill a book. I saw 3 teenagers chasing a bear past the FB cabins and down a hill, yelling as they ran. After two minutes I heard yelling again, and the bear was chasing the boys! Hilarious! Back then the Park hadn't learned how to secure garbage cans, so a common sight was a bear 1/2 way into a 30 gallon can, head first, and often they's fall in, but they'd just thrash around and knock the barrel over to get out. We had one bear come through our gas station, and we all picked up a tool and chased him out and threw tools at him. He climbed a 50' pine tree right to the top so fast that branches were breaking off. We worked alternating shifts of 6am to 2pm and 2pm to 10pm ... this gave us 1/2 day off before and after our full day off, so almost 2 days off per week. We had 14 guys at our station, the 2nd busiest gas station in America (gallons sold per day) after the Canyon station, so each shift had six guys working and 2 guys on their day off. I had a great pal with the same day off, and several times we hitch-hiked (only 2 of 21 guys in our bunkhouse had cars) toward the east entrance to climb a mountain. We climbed Top Notch, Grizzly Peak, and Avalanche Peak ... in our street shoes, no water, no food. No problems and a helluva lotta fun skiing down the steep shale mountains with our butts on our heels and once at the tree line, grabbing a tree to stop. After 10pm at night, most of us
Savages went out partying, beach parties, woodsies, lots of cheap Glucksteit malt liquor in 8 oz cans, two of which made you dizzy at 8, 000' altitude. I was 20, and that was my first drink of liquor. Lots of crazy stuff happened late at night to us "Savages" (the tourists were called "Dudes"), almost always involving liquor. We learned to buy cans of Coke and drink a bit, then pour in some Jim Beam and shake it up ... good stuff! The only reasonable thing we did at night was go dancing at the lobby of Lake Hotel, where there was a three or four man band, with the Twist being the latest sensation. Worse, we would go spotlighting for bears, especially if we heard there were grizzlies grazing in the area. One night four of us in a pickup truck found two huge griz grazing near the cabin office, so we parked the truck about 60 feet from them with the headlights on them. I stupidly got out and stood by the front of the truck with a spotlight. Suddenly both bears reared up on their hind legs, and the pickup took off, leaving me with two HUGE bears running at me. I spun around instantly, and FLEW to the cabin office back door (still open) ... I think I covered that 60 feet at 40mph 'cuz I beat those grizzlies, but I smashed the door handle into the wall and almost killed some tourists lined up as I flew between them and crashed into the far corner of the room, screaming "The grizzlies are after me!" I hurried out the front door and went back to the bunkhouse, happy to be alive. Though the bears can run 35 mph, I'm sure they stopped as I disappeared around a cabin, and they were laughing to themselves about the whole thing. Another time I came out the back door of the bunkhouse and found a huge mama black bear sitting down just outside. I was drunk and had just learned the twist, so I started twisting & singing right up close to the bear, and she started swaying back and forth, twisting along with me! Another deadly but fun thing was to go "hot-potting" ... illegally sitting in the Firestone River near Old Faithful where the boiling waters were pouring into the icy river. You had to be careful to find a spot where the temperature was just right, and when you did, you could extend one arm and get burned, while extending the other arm and get frozen. The best hot-potting by far was in the Yellowstone River just north of Mammoth Village enroute to Gardner, MT. We parked on a hill and climbed down to the river, everyone with a six-pack of Olympia beer. There were dozens of people each time I visited, and the river was so fast that it was scary except we were drunk so it wasn't. After every beer, we threw the bottle across the river. I bet there are many thousands of broken Olympia bottles still there. That summer was the best summer of my life (I'm now 77), but I was lucky to survive it considering all the dangerous things I did (we all did!). I came back after college graduation in 1963 and worked again at Conoco, this time at Mammoth, but only for half the summer ... I had to leave early to attend USAF Officer Training School in San Antonio. That summer wasn't so great. We had at least one thief robbing the till, and this made for a stressful work environment. Hot potting and beer busts were all we did. No bears to speak of there or anything else ... no lake, no beach, no huge campgrounds with lots of girls camping with their families and loving to flirt with the Conoco guys like at Fishing Bridge. I was happy to leave that place. So a few years later, they eliminated the campgrounds in most of the park, including ALL of Fishing Bridge, and they removed ALL of the cabins from Fishing Bridge until all that was left was the gas station, the Ham store, and the cafeteria, which finally went away too. Fishing from the bridge became forbidden, and sadly, the bears were removed to the high country ... so Fishing Bridge went from being the biggest place in YP to the smallest in one fell swoop. The worst change however, took place over several years, and that was the pricing of what accommodations were left available. Lake Hotel, the best sleep in the park, was $22/night for a standard room in 1981. Today that room is $460/night. You read that right! In the 70's I asked to see the Presidential Suite at the hotel, and it was magnificent and cost only $60/night. My guess today is about $1, 000/night. So with the campgrounds almost all gone and the tiny cabins almost all gone but for a few at Lake Lodge, Lake Hotel, and Old Faithful Lodge, and the prices ON THE MOON, Yellowstone has become a place for the very rich, where before for many, many years it was the playground for the common American citizen and his family. No longer. The vehicles you see parked overnight are German or oversized SUVs, for the most part. The common folks drive through, see a few sights, and keep on going out of the park. It's no longer OUR greatest national park ... it's now simply a paradise for the elites only. It's a terrible tale, but it's the damned truth and easy to verify. I probably visited YP about 26 times (first time at age 11, where I fed a cracker to a bear through the wing vent window of my grandpa's 1950 Buick). I did have some memorable experiences in a few of those years ... in 1966 I was an Air Force Officer and drove my '63 Corvette Stingray convertible with a gorgeous, young LA filly toward Fishing Bridge from Cody. As we approached Fishing Bridge there was a bear jam . We were about 10 cars back from the front, so I got out and then climbed onto the back of my car to see what was happening ... and I saw a most incredible sight: while a big mama bear stood atop a 15 foot hill alongside the road, her three medium sized cubs were on the road with people all around them when suddenly a woman raised her movie camera while her husband placed their 3 year old daughter ONTO THE BACK OF A CUB! At this point I was screaming at them to get away from the cubs, but they ignored me. I figure the only reason the mama didn't attack was that she was fearful of the large crowd. How can anybody be so dumb? Incredible! Another year I pitched my tent alongside the road late at night somewhere between Fishing Bridge and Canyon, and I awoke to find 4'' of SNOW on top of my tent! And it was July 4th! But now, if you're NOT a wealthy elite, don't plan on sleeping in YP. It's not ours anymore.

Author — Tim Randall

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I worked at Yellowstone the summers of 2015 and 2016. I totally agree with you: No one should go there. Because if you love the outdoors, and you go to Yellowstone, you will leave your heart there, and every day, for the rest of your life, you will live in longing . . . to return. (Thank you for the video. It does help relieve the aching somewhat.)

Author — SewCal Stitcher

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OMG, Yellowstone lovers, dont lisen to him!! and you are being to judgeamental of NATURE!!

Author — addievids

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Yellowstone, Glacier, Yosemite, all the National Parks all terrible places. Don't go to there. Their full of wild animals and fresh air. Horrible.

Author — Scott Montgomery