How The Great Plague Demolished A City | Absolute History

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How The Great Plague Demolished A City | Absolute History 5
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The Great Plague of 1665 killed 100,000 Londoners – one in three of the people living in the city. While kept diaries have provided terrifying testaments to the horrors of that summer, other stories have been hidden in the archives of London churches for centuries. Rare documents unearthed in some of the cities oldest places of worship now tell the story of what it was like for an ordinary person, more often than not living in poverty, as the plague swept through London. This factual drama follows the lives of those living in Cock and Key Alley, one of the dank and dismal yards squeezed between Fleet Street and the Thames – and brings to life 17th Century London at one of its most frightening moments.

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Content licensed from Digital Rights Group (DRG).

Produced by Juniper Communications LTD.

From the original documentary, The Great Plague.

💬 Comments on the video
Author

I can't help but imagine how it must have felt when you're already ill, your head is buzzing with the rising fever, and the plague doctor walks in. That alone must have been terrifying. The treatments were unspeakable.

Author — Miriam Bucholtz

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BRING OUT YOUR DEAD *clang*
BRING OUT YOUR DEAD
*clang*
I’m not dead yet!

Author — April Rants

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They really capture the muck and grossness of the time. I feel sick just watching this.

Author — CDCanada

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40:57 That lady is giving the performance of her life! That is some raw emotion on display.

Author — Robert Syrett

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They always blame dogs for disease. Killing the cats was the worst possible thing ever.

Author — London Calling

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Rip 1600 people, dogs cats, rats rip what a terrible time to be around and alive!

Author — strawberry blonde

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New Absolute History upload?

Stop the world, I gotta watch this.

Author — T. Bender

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no sure why i am fascinated by plague docs, maybe i was victim in another life. lol. Darn i saw this one already.will watch again though. i wsh they would do another of these but for other countries that were plague ridden maybe Germany or Italy anywhere really, since it ended up all over Europe.

Author — Gianna

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I wonder what life was like in the country compared to life in major cities of those times.

Author — Darcy King

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Fantastic documentary. Really brings the horror to life. Thank you for making it

Author — Allycat g

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Already saw this on Timeline but I love it. It brings a more personal experience to this horrific and tragic time in history

Author — Dannii S

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Who is watching this during the Coronavirus lockdown? 😂😂

Author — sugar puff

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I just finished watching this and it's brilliant, a must watch, excellent quality good audio and very informative.
Thank you for the upload.

Author — Marcus Sparticus

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At 13:37 I need a break already. How did people live like that?

Author — A3Kr0n

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wow this honestly one of the best documentaries i've seen! everything is told very well and it really gives a feel of those disturbing times. i need to binge on this channel now-

Author — fluffideer

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Locked in with your week dead family only to know your next. I can't imagine that kind of horror

Author — Meg W

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My mother was born right in the middle of the 1918 "Spanish Flu" epidemic in New York City (over 4, 000 dead in the first three weeks). As she put it, "When her mother's fever broke, her water broke." Both survived.

Author — RetMSgt in Pa.

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The "Great Fire" was in September of 1666. The death toll from that was said to be fewer than 100, even though tens of thousands of homes were destroyed, and many records of Plague deaths were destroyed in that fire.

Author — bcgrote

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They needed to burn their clothes and take baths

Author — Doug Williams

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Damn that’s nasty. Glad I don’t live then and there 😪 They really walked so we could run.

Author — Isabelle Oh-Criner